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Sarangapani temple, Kumbakonam

During my 4 month trip round Southern India in 2015, I stayed in many Temple towns. Here is the Sarangapani temple, in Kumbakonam

At a distance of 2 km from Kumbakonam Railway Station and 500 m from Adi Kumbeswarar Temple, Sarangapani Temple is a Hindu temple situated in Kumbakonam.

The temple is dedicated to Lord Vishnu. Sarangam means bow and pani means hand. The deity is having a bow in the hand. Also known as Tiru Kudanthai is the third of the 108 Divya Desams. The Sarangapani Temple is also one of the Pancha Ranga Khestras with the other four being Srirangapatnam, Srirangam, Appalarangam, Parimala Ranganatha Perumal Temple at Mayiladuthurai and Vatarangam at Sirkazhi.

Sarangapani Temple is the biggest Vishnu temple in Kumbakonam. It is of great religious significance and considered to be second only to the Srirangam Temple in Trichy. The temple boasts of 5 prakaras and a holy tank which is known as Porthamarai Kulam. The rajagopuram has 11 tiers and has a height of 150 feet. This is the third tallest temple gopuram among the Divya Desams other two are Srirangam (236 feet) and Srivilliputhur (192 feet).

Chariot festival is the most prominent festival of the temple, celebrated during the Tamil month of Chittirai (March-April). The twin temple chariots are the third largest in Tamil Nadu, each weighing 300 tons. Brahmotsavam, spring festival and Navaratri are the other important festivals of this temple
I have included a pic of the chariots that are pulled by the devotees....

Posted by TheJohnsons 20:03 Archived in India Tagged art architecture sculptures tower monument culture temple religion history traditional travel statue india indian white building world shadows beautiful heritage sculpture place stone old historical black site religious wall asian asia antique ancient tourism tamil nadu vintage god landmark hinduism decoration colorful hindu carved tamilnadu decorated engraved gopuram kumbakonam sarangapani

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